Spring Clean Your Body – Detox Easily by Spacing Mealtimes Out as Long as Possible

Springtime is here!  The tulips and cherry blossoms are out in force along with the snails who accompany those regular spring showers…   But along with the flowers comes that inevitable itch to rid the house of those winter dust balls hidden behind the couch and the ancient fingerprints that patchwork the windows and light switches.

Ah – the joy of spring cleaning!  (Grrr) I spent all of yesterday in my underwear cleaning furiously while blasting Kylie Minogue’s Fever album.  Unfortunately, I am more of a seasonal scrubber since I have far too little time to make a day-to-day art of it.   But, as I cleaned I had to ask myself, wouldn’t this have been less work if I had been more organized?

The same philosophy applies to the cleaning of one’s body.  In an age where we are under many pressures and combining a busy work and home life, it is easy to be careless about our eating habits.   Under pressure we may munch on acid forming foods or drinks throughout the day or drink too much coffee or exercise less.  These habits create stress on the body’s ability to detoxify itself making it more acidic and inflamed.  Poor detoxification can lead to aging, cancer, diabetes, weight gain and even (as epigenetics tell us) worse genes for our future offspring.

Wellness-by-Charriol

However, with a little organization and discipline, your body actually detoxes itself.  Yep.   As the wonderful Dr. Alejandro Junger says in his book Clean:

“When the digestive tract isn’t constantly needing to work to process food, the body can direct energy towards detox and repair.  Making sure your meals are full of fat and protein keeps you from needing to constantly graze and keeps blood sugar levels stable.  It also allows the body to go into fat-burning mode more easily, which releases more stubborn toxins stored in fat cells.” Continue reading

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Sprouting: Lola’s Revelation – 10 Reasons to Sprout

My crunchy vegan friends have been harping for years about sprouting.  Sprouting beans, nuts, seeds – if there was a solid crumb on the floor they’d probably snatch it up and cover it in water.  I had only half an ear cocked until I met Lola.

I met her at an art opening in Paris.  She was your basic nightmare – clear-skinned, gorgeous waist-length chestnut hair, mysterious long hooded green eyes, tapering fingers and lips so naturally plump they actually had that little line of cleavage that looks like a cleft in the chin… I was drawn to her and followed her surreptitiously while mulling my opening gambit and wondering if I had finally become a lesbian. (It would make sense given my recent history – but that will be a book so stay tuned…)

Finally, we both lingered in front of a particularly abstract rendition of black and red chaos.  I ventured a tentative comment coupled with a flirty laugh.  She responded.  But I didn’t want to talk about the art.  I wanted to know about her canvas – her perfect skin.  What were her secrets?  It’s not as if she was 30.  She was older.  I could tell by her walk, her attitude.  This was someone that had lived.  Had I finally met another vampire? Maybe we could go somewhere and share a bite…

Like everyone Lola enjoyed a compliment.  A few more and she was ready to share.  Her secret: sprouted beans.  Lola is a vegetarian and she swore up and down about the MAGICAL results of sprouting.  She sprouts beans, nuts and seeds around the clock.  They are her protein, her vitamins, her enzymes – her glorious skin.

But why? But how?

10 Reasons to Sprout Continue reading

Pop a Cherry for Ageless Skin and Other Startling Benefits

I have been eating literally pounds of cherries in the past few weeks and because my skin looks more fabulous than usual I started did a little bit of research – and ran out to buy some more!

Cherry season is NOW and once you read the below you won’t want to miss out on the chance to eat as many as possible while you can.  Aim for organic as always.

A member of the plum family, most commercial cherries are derived from just two species: the sweet – or wild cherry – known as Prunus Avium, and the sour cherry, known as Prunus Cerasus.

Cherries have been used as a medical aid since the 1950′s to treat gout sufferers, since their ability to reduce uric acid in the blood improves symptoms significantly. But as studies into this bright juicy berry advance, more and more is being discovered about how cherries can improve our health: Continue reading