Food Order and Combining – Why it is Important for Beauty, Health, Energy and Weight Loss

Choosing what to eat and when to eat and what to eat it with are questions that everyone faces daily. Most of us are calorie counters following mainstream diet trends that we pick up from beauty magazines, friends or hear that our favorite celebs are following. But few of us have been educated on the importance of food sequence or food combining. For me, it was a revelation that took pounds off, increased my energy and made my skin glow! I credit the books of Natalia Rose (guru and goddess) and the incredible Kimberly Snyder. Chapeau ladies!  I wish someone had taught me these practices as a child. My daughter is reaping the benefits!

The trick is to maximize the benefits of the foods that we consume in order to gain crucial vitamins, minerals and enzymes. Proper sequential food ordering and pairing enable us to avoid diets and achieve glowing skin because this practice optimizes digestion. A glorious side effect will be greater energy and deeper sleep. The more effectively you can master this practice the less you will have to work at exercising to lose weight. Optimal digestion leads to natural skin toning!

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Cranberries – a Superfood You Never Really Considered

Most women think that cranberries are useful only for helping eradicate or prevent UTI infections.  But the health benefits of cranberries are far more wide-ranging and even a tad surprising.

Cranberry (Vaccinium macrocarpon) is a small round red colored fruit which is native to America.  It typically grows in bogs.  If you’ve ever been in Nantucket you may have seen its extensive bogs.  Nantucket is home to some of the largest contiguous cranberry bogs in the world where cranberries have been grown since 1857. American cranberry is one of the only three species of fruit native to North America. The other species are blueberry and bilberry.  Cranberry gets its name from “crane-berry” because its stem and flower resemble the head, neck, and beak of a crane.

Cranberries are high in vitamin C and fiber and only 45 calories per cup. In disease-fighting antioxidants, cranberries outrank nearly every fruit and vegetable–including strawberries, spinach, broccoli, red grapes, apples, raspberries, and cherries.   They have strong antibacterial effects in the body and eating cranberries prevents viruses and bacteria from attaching itself to the body.  Something else to think about before sleeping with someone you don’t know well! (While women often drink unsweetened cranberry juice to treat an infection, there’s no hard evidence that works.) The National Institutes of Health (NIH) is funding research on the cranberry’s effects on heart disease, yeast infections and other conditions, and other researchers are investigating its potential against cancer, stroke and viral infections.

One cup of whole cranberries has 8,983 total antioxidant capacity. Only blueberries can top that: Wild varieties have 13,427; cultivated blueberries have 9,019. Continue reading