Cranberries – a Superfood You Never Really Considered

Most women think that cranberries are useful only for helping eradicate or prevent UTI infections.  But the health benefits of cranberries are far more wide-ranging and even a tad surprising.

Cranberry (Vaccinium macrocarpon) is a small round red colored fruit which is native to America.  It typically grows in bogs.  If you’ve ever been in Nantucket you may have seen its extensive bogs.  Nantucket is home to some of the largest contiguous cranberry bogs in the world where cranberries have been grown since 1857. American cranberry is one of the only three species of fruit native to North America. The other species are blueberry and bilberry.  Cranberry gets its name from “crane-berry” because its stem and flower resemble the head, neck, and beak of a crane.

Cranberries are high in vitamin C and fiber and only 45 calories per cup. In disease-fighting antioxidants, cranberries outrank nearly every fruit and vegetable–including strawberries, spinach, broccoli, red grapes, apples, raspberries, and cherries.   They have strong antibacterial effects in the body and eating cranberries prevents viruses and bacteria from attaching itself to the body.  Something else to think about before sleeping with someone you don’t know well! (While women often drink unsweetened cranberry juice to treat an infection, there’s no hard evidence that works.) The National Institutes of Health (NIH) is funding research on the cranberry’s effects on heart disease, yeast infections and other conditions, and other researchers are investigating its potential against cancer, stroke and viral infections.

One cup of whole cranberries has 8,983 total antioxidant capacity. Only blueberries can top that: Wild varieties have 13,427; cultivated blueberries have 9,019. Continue reading

Pop a Cherry for Ageless Skin and Other Startling Benefits

I have been eating literally pounds of cherries in the past few weeks and because my skin looks more fabulous than usual I started did a little bit of research – and ran out to buy some more!

Cherry season is NOW and once you read the below you won’t want to miss out on the chance to eat as many as possible while you can.  Aim for organic as always.

A member of the plum family, most commercial cherries are derived from just two species: the sweet – or wild cherry – known as Prunus Avium, and the sour cherry, known as Prunus Cerasus.

Cherries have been used as a medical aid since the 1950′s to treat gout sufferers, since their ability to reduce uric acid in the blood improves symptoms significantly. But as studies into this bright juicy berry advance, more and more is being discovered about how cherries can improve our health: Continue reading

3 Reasons Why Modern Vampires are drinking Pomegranate Juice Instead of Blood to Remain Ageless

Pomegranates are a superfood.  A food so powerful you are actually an idiot if you ignore their existence.

Pomegranate juice was really one of my top anti-aging musts during the wild days in NY, London and Paris.  I hunted it down to make sure it was on hand or, in a crunch, I would pop a few pomegranate extract vitamins after a particularly wild night.  The results? My moniker as ‘the vampire’…

But why are pomegranates so powerful? Continue reading

Cauliflower Fights Cancer, Detoxifies the Body, Battles Aging and Reduces Puffiness

I have dissected a few bodies in my time but could never face a close-up of the inside of a human skull.  Perhaps this hesitation explains why I have never had a taste for cauliflower which looks like an albino version of a brain wrapped prettily in a base of green leaves.

However, once I understood the super-charged powers of this remarkable cruciferous veggie – I embraced it – along with the numerous creative ways one can serve it up. Continue reading